Cheese Pairing – Pink Moscato, Merlot, and Pinot Grigio with Havarti, Parmesan, and Feta

Yay for wine and cheese!!

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Matching shirts!!!! YAY!

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Top: Feta

Left: Parmesan

Right: Havarti

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Beringer – Pinot Grigio

 

LET’S TASTE!

Havarti:

  • Pinot Grigio: This Pinot Grigio was lighter than other Pinot Grigios I have had lately – less acidic with more sweet pear. I liked it! With the Havarti it was tasty because the wine is sweet and the cheese is really smokey and salty – but it was an odd pairing. I think I would prefer a slightly less-sweet wine with this cheese. The creamy texture of the cheese was accentuated by the smoothness of this white wine, rather than interrupted by a hard acidic finish.
  • Pink Moscato: I have never had a pink Moscato before, and I actually really liked it! I prefer to stay away from pink wines because they’re too sweet for my liking, but this was a very nice treat aside from the slightly-more-acidic Pinot Grigio. The strawberry is prominent in this wine and it pairs very nicely with the Havarti. This is perfect balance between salty and sweet, and the creamy texture of the cheese makes the wine’s flavor last longer.
  • Merlot: This is my favorite wine with this cheese! The tannic composition of the wine pairs well with the salty and sharp taste of the Havarti, but the creamy texture  compensates for the lessened sweetness compared to the Pinot Grigio and Pink Moscato. This red is sweeter than other tannic reds I have had, and I can really pick up on the cherry notes. I would drink this Merlot with Havarti again.

Parmesan:

  • Pinot Grigio: This was a truly poor pairing – the wine was FAR too sweet for the cheese, as it is a dry and crumbly slice of parmesan rather than the creamy texture of the Havarti and Feta. The cheese is delicious on it’s own, but brings way too much of the alcoholic aftertaste of the Pinot Grigio into the spotlight. I think a wine with higher tannins might be more appropriate with this wine.
  • Pink Moscato: This is my favorite pairing with parmesan, which is strange because I did not like it with the Pinot Grigio. However, I think I like it more because the strawberry flavors are more pleasant with the crumbly, salty cheese than the acidic and sweet Pinot Grigio.
  • Merlot: Something about this combination made me cringe more than any other combination so far, I really cannot pinpoint it but something made me have a reflex to this combination. The

Feta:

  • Pinot Grigio: The Pinot Grigio’s sharply-sweet pear taste was interrupted by the sour taste of the Feta. Usually this Feta is very creamy and easy to eat by the handful (and I do) – but I’m strangely repulsed by this combination.
  • Pink Moscato: I just gagged and that’s not an exaggeration. DON’T DO IT! The feta is way too sour for this wine pairing. It needs something that is tannic, I think. We’ll see what I think about the Merlot.
  • Merlot: This wasn’t the worst thing I’ve ever done, but also not going to call home about it. This was the best of the three wine options because it was the most tannic and least sweet, but there was still a dramatic finish on the cheese that really drew attention to the high alcohol content of this wine. This is the only time that I’ve noticed how high alcohol this Merlot is, because in the other pairings it has been subdued by the cheese.

Overall, I prefer Feta with Merlot, Havarti with Merlot, and Parmesan with Pink Moscato. The Pinot Grigio was not good with any of these cheese options, but hopefully soon I’ll find a good cheese to enjoy with this wine!

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CHEERS!

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